Presidential Opinion

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The Virginian-Pilot, Norfolk, VA

To Survive, Colleges Must Adapt and Change

To Survive, Colleges Must Adapt and Change

February 04, 2019

Scott D. Miller, president of Virginia Wesleyan University, writes:  Higher education felt the impact of the long shutdown of the federal government. Beyond the effects of the shutdown, the new year prompts renewed attention to longstanding concerns of affordability, institutional relevance and the ability of colleges and universities to compete successfully for enrollments and resources. Ever optimistic as I am, however, I see the new year also offering unprecedented opportunities for success. 
Scott D. Miller, president of Virginia Wesleyan University, writes:  Higher education felt the impact of the long shutdown of the federal government. Beyond the effects of the shutdown, the new year prompts renewed attention to longstanding concerns of affordability, institutional relevance and the ability of colleges and universities to compete successfully for enrollments and resources. Ever optimistic as I am, however, I see the new year also offering unprecedented opportunities for success. 

February 04, 2019

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

This Is Higher Education’s Gilded Age

This Is Higher Education’s Gilded Age

February 04, 2019

Brian Rosenberg, president of Macalester College (MN), writes:  In The Chronicle Review, Steven Brint suggests that, despite tales of gloom and doom, we are, in fact, living in higher education’s "golden age." I would revise that assertion. What we are experiencing is not a "golden age" but a "gilded age," one marked by an increasing concentration of wealth and prestige among a small group of elite institutions and a growing disparity between those colleges and the rest of American higher education.
Brian Rosenberg, president of Macalester College (MN), writes:  In The Chronicle Review, Steven Brint suggests that, despite tales of gloom and doom, we are, in fact, living in higher education’s "golden age." I would revise that assertion. What we are experiencing is not a "golden age" but a "gilded age," one marked by an increasing concentration of wealth and prestige among a small group of elite institutions and a growing disparity between those colleges and the rest of American higher education.

February 04, 2019

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

College Presidents Can’t Shoulder All the Blame for Racism on Their Campuses

College Presidents Can’t Shoulder All the Blame for Racism on Their...

January 30, 2019

Walter M. Kimbrough, president, Dillard University writes: Like so many cases over the past four years, beginning with the protests at the University of Missouri at Columbia, I have seen numerous instances of students demanding that their institutions, and particularly their presidents, do something to end racism, diversify the faculty, provide safe spaces, etc. Uncomfortably I’ve watched video of students’ yelling at and berating their presidents for not doing enough to immediately remedy America’s original sin.
Walter M. Kimbrough, president, Dillard University writes: Like so many cases over the past four years, beginning with the protests at the University of Missouri at Columbia, I have seen numerous instances of students demanding that their institutions, and particularly their presidents, do something to end racism, diversify the faculty, provide safe spaces, etc. Uncomfortably I’ve watched video of students’ yelling at and berating their presidents for not doing enough to immediately remedy America’s original sin.

January 30, 2019

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

Yes, We Need Accountability. But We Also Need Institutional Diversity.

Yes, We Need Accountability. But We Also Need Institutional Diversity.

January 25, 2019

Patricia McGuire, President, Trinity Washington University writes: Among many proposals for accreditation reform put forward by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, her call for accreditors to "honor individual campus missions" and avoid "one size fits all" methods has some appeal for colleges that focus on specific populations. While mission considerations have always been part of accreditation, across the past decade the rise of data-driven assessment and public-data aggregators like the College Scorecard has placed increasingly onerous burdens on institutions whose metrics often look different from the mainstream, including many women’s colleges, historically black colleges and universities, and minority-serving institutions.
Patricia McGuire, President, Trinity Washington University writes: Among many proposals for accreditation reform put forward by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, her call for accreditors to "honor individual campus missions" and avoid "one size fits all" methods has some appeal for colleges that focus on specific populations. While mission considerations have always been part of accreditation, across the past decade the rise of data-driven assessment and public-data aggregators like the College Scorecard has placed increasingly onerous burdens on institutions whose metrics often look different from the mainstream, including many women’s colleges, historically black colleges and universities, and minority-serving institutions.

January 25, 2019

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Los Angeles Times

Free Tuition Isn’t the Best Way to Improve Access to College

Free Tuition Isn’t the Best Way to Improve Access to College

January 14, 2019

Jeff Abernathy, president of Alma College (MI), writes:  Many politicians today perceive the idea of free tuition as a winning strategy, and it’s easy to see why. Young people are more anxious than ever about getting a college education as a path to a more successful career, and college debt is on the rise. But, despite what the term implies, free tuition is not the best way to enable more students to afford a college education.
Jeff Abernathy, president of Alma College (MI), writes:  Many politicians today perceive the idea of free tuition as a winning strategy, and it’s easy to see why. Young people are more anxious than ever about getting a college education as a path to a more successful career, and college debt is on the rise. But, despite what the term implies, free tuition is not the best way to enable more students to afford a college education.

January 14, 2019

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